andrew hawryshkewich

teaching CV — Jan 2018

This is the complete teaching dossier and CV of Andrew Hawryshkewich as part of my work in the School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT), in the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology (FCAT), at Simon Fraser University (SFU). Available in this document are:

Introduction

In my application to work at SIAT over four years ago I opened my cover letter with a statement that read: "I am an instructor dedicated to improving student experience." For me, improving said experience means creating a learning environment that promotes discourse, supports student learning, and offers students opportunities to extend their learning into the world beyond the classroom. I believe my work at SIAT has demonstrated my continued commitment to this goal.

To illustrate this commitment, the sections below include an explanation of my teaching philosophy as well as highlights of teaching and service initiatives within SFU and outside of SFU that improve student experience. My curriculum design work, reflections on teaching, and future directions within the department all provide further evidence of my commitment to student experience. Included for reference are all teaching evaluations, a complete listing of courses taught, service to SFU and the community, professional development, projects outside SFU, and education.

Teaching philosophy

One of the challenges I am driven by as an instructor is to help my students succeed. To succeed in my courses. To be critical of what they learn and do. To learn the skills required beyond SIAT. To find meaningful employment after their degree. Achieving success in the interdisciplinarity which SIAT offers is a unique challenge for students and instructors alike, and my approaches below try to address that challenge head-on.

To support students in my courses, I offer access to course materials and concepts in a variety of ways. Within the lecture, this has taken on the form of iClicker games demonstrating design concepts and a live in-class sketching response system (Parti) which allow for students to engage with the material by directly practicing skills learned within the lecture itself, mimicking how students might learn within a studio setting. Working with mobile-friendly lectures and course content has been another means of ensuring students have an extended mobile learning (1) environment which allows them to access the material in a flexible fashion. Resources like commented coding tutorial files means that students can call upon resources both during and after the course. Given the large enrolments of many of the courses I teach, I often work with the support of a team of TAs to deliver course content. To ensure student success, my TAs must be effectively supported and mentored. This is why I continue to run workshops and maintain a variety of TA resources to help support them in their development.

To be able to critically reflect upon their work, students require time, focus, and repetition. In SIAT-terms, a constant meaningful practice that students start from early in their careers and continue to upper division courses is necessary. That is why starting students with reflective learning portfolios in first year is key to ensuring that they have time to develop a depth of understanding sufficient to allow for meaningful reflective practice. To continue supporting students once they reach their upper years at SIAT, I try and nurture their interests by completing directed studies as much as possible. Directed studies offer a more focused mentorship for students, meaning I can challenge their ideas and push them to be more critical of their practice and the domains they are exploring.

Interdisciplinarity often makes it difficult to situate oneself in the world outside the classroom. To help students see the connections between what they do in class and beyond, I have taken a couple of approaches. First, the industry to course integrations that I have organized help bring existing real-world problems into the classroom. This problem-based learning (2) gives students a low-stakes way to explore and propose solutions to real-world design problems without having a career on the line. Second, both the SIAT Mixer and the SIAT Design Jam offer students an opportunity to meet and network with industry. The Design Jam enables them to practice their skills and collaborate with industry and alumni on future-oriented conceptual problems. Facilitating such events offers students insight into how their skills might fit in real-world problem solving, while providing opportunities to see a path to future employment. Third, working on the SIAT identity project has offered me an opportunity to help the outside world understand our students by clarifying the public identity of the school.

Major Contributions

This section highlights significant teaching innovations, curricular development, and community service over my time with the department.

iClicker Games

2012

To make use of the iClickers required of IAT-102 in more ways than just polling students.

Custom iClicker games were experiments in teaching design concepts with 5 buttons (of the iClicer) and 192 students. I developed these games for IAT-102 — Graphic Design — to offer more direct interaction with design concepts than the usual multiple-guess format offered by the iClicker software. Games covered a range of design topics including adjusting line-length, letter-spacing, mixing colours, positioning elements on a grid and live question/answer polling.

Work on iClicker Games was presented at the SFU Symposium on Teaching & Learning (May 2012).

Resources on iClicker Games:

Parti

2014 - 2016

To enable discussion and critique of student generated work live, in lecture, to allow for a more 'studio-based' experience.

Having taught our first-year Graphic Design (IAT-102) course a number of times, I had come to realize that sketching and discussing sketching in lecture could be a tedious experience in paper collection and sorting. As a result, I decided to develop a demo of an in-class participation system that allowed students to use their existing mobile devices to snap and post images of their work for immediate review. I could then select, draw, and discuss submissions with the entire lecture hall, allowing for quick and direct feedback on common errors or concerns.

After piloting the project in the Summer 2014 term as a self-built web app, I applied and then developed Parti in Summer 2015 in collaboration with IT Services as part of a TLC Learning Technology Development Grant. Parti is now available as an open-sourced Canvas external app (LTI).

Work on Parti has been presented at the SFU Symposium on Teaching & Learning (May 2016), the BC Festival of Learning (June 2016), the Sketching in Practice Symposium (June 2016), and InstructureCon (July 2016). Research on the system was completed by Arita Liu as part of the Summer 2015 development of the system.

Resources on Parti:

Online Course Content

Ongoing since 2013.

To ensure students have easy, open and mobile-friendly access to course materials without logins or passwords.

I have taken up the practice of ensuring all course materials — lectures, assignment outlines, rubrics, coding tutorials, reading lists, etc. — are available to students online, in a mobile-web-friendly format. Lecture slides in particular are designed to format themselves for mobile devices effectively.

Sample online materials:

TA Training

Ongoing since 2009.

To mentor potential future instructors to improve their own practice, as well as the experience for the students they teach.

Exploring mentorship and improving teaching quality is important to me, both personally and for my team. These are issues I have continued exploring since the 2009 SIAT TA Training, where I presented on preparing labs and facilitating discussion in the classroom with Ben Unterman (SIAT, PhD Candidate). My involvement in TA training has continued with the Spring 2010 and Fall 2010 Burnaby TA/TM Days where I presented on the use of technology in the classroom. When our TA training became integrated with SFU at large (2013), I turned to developing a guide for my own TAs to review common TAing concerns when first starting out.

More recently (2014) I have worked with the likes of Sarah Louise-Turner (Educational Consultant, TLC) to develop a workshop around software facilitation, a gap we identified in the SFU-wide TA training that was especially evident in SIAT. The workshop ended up serving both our TA's as well as the student-led TechBytes software mentorship program.

As there has been renewed interest in SIAT-focused TA training, I have worked with Chantal Gibson (Senior Lecturer, SIAT), Sarah Louise-Turner Sarah Louise-Turner (Educational Consultant, TLC), and Paul Brokenshire (MEd Candidate, SFU) as one of the organizers and facilitators for the Fall 2016 SIAT TA Training. My role involves developing the Facilitating a Lab session in addition to preparing a Canvas package for all SIAT TA-related materials. The first session for 2016 was exceptionally well attended with 38 new and future TAs attending.

Sample materials:

First-year Portfolio

2015 - 2016

To help guide students into effective reflective practice through the development of their own portfolio.

As part of ensuring our first-year students are prepared to critically reflect on their own work and the work of others, Chantal Gibson (Senior Lecturer, SIAT) and I took on a Teaching and Learning Development Grant to integrate portfolio practice across two of our first year-courses — Graphic Design and Design Communication & Collaboration. We developed a portfolio activity that had students engage in design thinking and reflective practice through a process analysis of their work. Our work included the development of shared instructions and grading criteria that explicitly integrated the design and writing principles taught in both courses.

Work on the First-year Portfolio project was presented at the SFU Symposium on Teaching & Learning (May 2016).

Portfolio project resources:

Industry/Course Integrations

Ongoing since 2014.

To help students connect their work in the classroom to real-world contexts through problem-based learning.

I continue to facilitate and welcome industry-to-course integrations for my classes. In Web Design & Development (IAT-339), this has taken on the form of allowing students to bring in their own freelance design projects as part of the company website project by clarifying requirements and expectations with me. In Information Design (IAT-235) students have worked on the City of Burnaby's Golf Website (Fall 2014) and Online Services (Spring 2015) pages which ended for the most successful students in an internship with the city developing the new Golf Burnaby website. More recently students in the course have been working with the City of Vancouver through CityStudio:

In all the instances where IAT-235 has integrated with industry projects, industry members have come in and spoken about the projects, as well as critique and provide feedback on students' in-process and final materials.

SIAT Mixer

Ongoing since 2012.

To give undergraduate students an opportunity to hear what life outside of SIAT is like from alumni and members of industry.

As one of the lead organizers of the SIAT mixer, we — Andrea Barbera (Student Affairs Coordinator, SIAT), Stephanie Greaves (Co-op Coordinator, SIAT), SIAT Advising, and myself — have managed to annually bring out students, alumni, and industry to enjoy an evening of sharing ideas and experiences. It offers current students the opportunity to practice 'soft skills' such as networking and discussion that are so key to their future employment success. The event website is available at siatmixer.ca

The 2017 mixer brought in 32 students as well as 26 alumni and 32 industry members from Lighthouse Labs, EA, Neil Squire Society, MakerLabs, False Creek Healthcare, Advisor Websites, Sony Pictures Imageworks, Tideline Data, Stembolt Technologies, Crash Wave Games, Chocolate Stop, Sitemax Systems, Kaushakis Real Estate, The Runner Newspaper, Futuretown, City of Surrey, Emily Carr University, Samsung R&D Canada, Molecular You, West Vancouver Memorial Library, City of Coquitlam, Busan Sanai Games, Inventa, Procurify, Fraser Health, BrainStation, Plaid Consulting, Archiact VR, and D3 Security.

Attendees of the mixer shared their thoughts on the event:

"As a gathering for SIAT past, present and faculty, it was a great opportunity for alumni to catch up, say hello to professors and discuss ideas and topics with current SIAT students."
"Great work on creating networking events that haven't been done before. More of it, please."

SIAT Identity Project

Ongoing since 2015.

To readdress the SIAT identity in response to the program's current context.

As part of my time on the Communications Committee and in collaboration with Carman Neustaedter (Associate Professor, SIAT), I have been the facilitator for our department's identity clarifying process. This has been a multi-stage process which has involved the creation of identity development activities for school and committee meetings, as well as consultation with various stakeholders to create a more current, consistent and consolidated public identity for the school.

Curriculum design

This section provides a focused look at a specific curricular design problem within the context of three courses — Graphic Design (IAT-102), Information Design (IAT-235), and Web Design & Development (IAT-339) — to put some more of my contributions into context. For a listing of all courses taught and related materials (i.e. evaluations, lecture slides, etc), please refer to the listing of courses taught.

Graphic Design (IAT-102)

Taught and designed since 2012.

IAT-102 is a large — up to 192 students — first-year class which serves a significant number of SIAT majors and non-majors alike. In either case, students typically have little to no experience with the topic area. The scale of the class can make it particularly difficult to effectively teach design, given it is a field typically learned through significant amounts of iteration and critique. Given my experience with development and design, the course offered a unique opportunity to improve through innovation.

To create a more studio-based experience for students within the lecture.

The first attempt to create a more studio-based experience for students involved the devices they were already required to purchase for the course (in 2012): iClickers. In creating iClicker Games I was able to give students the opportunity to engage with design concepts in an interactive fashion. Rather than me describing or illustrating a specific concept, they could now play with that concept live, in lecture. They were well-regarded by students:

"The iclicker games were a great feature." (Spring 2012)
"Good iclicker games!" (Spring 2012)

While well-regarded, the iClicker Games were — in my perception — not providing students with as direct an opportunity to engage with course concepts as one might get in a studio class. Additionally, there were some students that expressed frustrations with having to purchase iClickers for the course:

"I didn't like that buying an iClicker was necessary." (Fall 2012)

As a result, the next step was to explore how to engage them in a design practice within the course effectively. Developing Parti was meant to resolve the concerns borne out of iClicker Games as it (a) had students sketching instead of pressing buttons, (b) included in-class critique and discussion of work, and (c) made use of their existing devices (smartphones) instead of requiring the purchase of an additional technology. These ideals for Parti were echoed by some of the research participants, who expressed the following:

"Participants all favoured the immediate feedback given in class on the displayed student work ... They also believed that anonymity encourages impartial feedback from which they could all benefit." (3)
"The Participants liked the fact that they could use their mobile devices in classroom. Using the system on their own devices required no extra learning time." (3)

While there are other improvements to still be made to Parti — issues such as the interface and workflow for instructors came up in research — I believe that in working to achieve a studio-lecture model in IAT-102, Parti allows for a level of in-lecture interaction not previously available within the class.

Information Design (IAT-235)

Taught and reworked since 2013.

IAT-235 is a medium-sized — originally 120 students, now 96 — second-year class which is the stepping stone from Graphic Design (IAT-102) to Web Design & Development (IAT-339) in SIAT pre-requisites. When I was handed the course in Fall 2013, it was requested that I readdress this laddering of the course to help it better serve IAT-339 as a pre-requisite. Beginning in Fall 2013, the course approached Information Design partially through the lens of information architecture and web design, to allow for a logical integration of HTML and CSS tutorials in the course. This step was generally understood and appreciated by students:

"I really appreciate that the course was reformatted and made kids learn HTML & CSS. I learned a lot and think this change should be kept." (Fall 2013)
"Integration of html/css is beneficial to future courses." (Fall 2013)

By the next term though (Spring 2014), the kinds of concerns around design vs. coding that came up in IAT-339 (discussed below) were being voiced by students in IAT-235. Additionally, the connection between information design as a discipline and the teaching of HTML/CSS was becoming a concern:

"The course now change to a code like course. The half of the course learn coding but not information design." (Spring 2014)
"The content of the lecture now is changed to the web site design (too much code writing). I don't think it is really related to information design." (Spring 2014)

As my approaches to dealing with the design vs. coding challenge are addressed more specifically in the section on IAT-339, the continuation of the discussion on IAT-235 focuses on the integration of problem-based learning challenges that began in response to students not finding the projects particularly engaging.

The integrations themselves — detailed in the industry/course integrations section — have been generally well-received by students, but occasionally the planning and relationship between course and industry can affect a course. In my first such integration with CityStudio, there were some issues with the speed at which the CityStudio partner responded with materials for students. This very quickly made the experience for students a bit more 'realistic' than I would have preferred, as it affected their understanding of projects negatively as a result:

"There were some moments early in the term where the communication lines were breaking down between him, City Studio/City of Vancouver, the TAs, and the students ..." (Fall 2015)

While perhaps a good real world learning for the students, it does not help students perform their best when my ability to deliver course content is contingent on a third party's responsiveness. As I should have known better at the time, lining up all requirements for the term beforehand — including external materials — would have avoided such an issue from arising.

Web Design & Development (IAT-339)

Taught and reworked since 2013.

IAT-339 is a small — originally 72 students, now 40 — third-year class which is a science credit within SIAT's design stream. The mix of design and coding has created a tension within the course that has been apparent since its inception. This was demonstrated by comments from the first offering of the course:

"For a science course, not enough coding. For a 3rd year course, material is too basic — HTML and CSS are taught in highschool! Make the course more advanced." (Spring 2013)
"Course expected too much from beginners." & "...it assumed some basic knowledge of coding which I didn't have." (Spring 2013)

From the comments, it became evident that the expectations of student's understanding of coding was both over and underestimated. My approach to the first term's responses was to try and readdress the overall structure and approach to the course through the Teaching and Learning Centre's Rethinking Teaching workshop — to try and design a curricular solution to the imbalance in student coding knowledge heading into the course. Approaches like covering a larger portion of the coding tutorials in lecture, as well as priming students with the expectation of the continual interplay between design and code in the course were introduced. Students still commented with similar concerns in the summer term:

"I think this course has trouble setting a standard of quality due to the vast range of skill levels of coding in this course." (Summer 2013)
"As someone with fairly extensive web experience, I came into this course expecting a focus on higher level web dev concepts ... However, despite its 300-level designation, this is a first year course. Which makes sense given the lack of previous web courses." (Summer 2013)

Student comments point at the larger curricular issue: there are no earlier courses to cover introductory material. Seeing this issue play out over the term and within the comments, the department saw that the best place to introduce web concepts earlier in the curriculum would be in IAT-235 (discussed above).

Since Fall 2013, IAT-235 has had new introductory web-coding curriculum embedded in it. Also, IAT-339 has moved to a 40-seat lecture which has allowed for more effective in-lecture coding instruction. This has levelled the student experience somewhat, but there is still a tension between students with prior experience (from IAT-235 or otherwise) and senior students who never took the revised IAT-235. As an interim solution, I started in Summer 2016 including 'advanced tasks' for coding tutorials to allow those with more experience to explore the code in more depth. Admittedly, it is still a design problem I have not quite yet resolved.

Reflections on Teaching

The prior section details my experiences and own learning in designing curriculum for students. Below is a reflection on how my practice has evolved over time as an instructor.

Now, do I still feel that "I am an instructor dedicated to improving student experience."? Yes, I do. Although now I believe I better understand the complexity of making such a demand on myself. The student experience does live at least partially within the classroom. This is why I believe continuing to explore how to create a more studio-esque lecture through the use of technology — such as iClicker Games and Parti — can help facilitate a better student experience. Enabling students to engage with topic material more directly means they can be more active about their learning, rather than passively interpreting my own ramblings on a topic. The research performed on Parti suggested its benefits, and educational tool development is an area that I would like to continue to explore as an instructor.

Still, within the classroom, the challenges of helping students understand the context of the course can be difficult when trying to introduce interdisciplinarity. As evidenced in the curriculum design of IAT-235 and IAT-339 there is a continuing problem with varying abilities when entering courses (IAT-339) as well as understanding why a design course should include a coding component (IAT-235). Culturally there is often a separation of these two roles so I can understand why students tend to distinguish and self-categorize as one or the other, but how to help students remove that separation? I don't yet know. What I do know, is that it is a challenge I am interested in exploring further in continuing my work at SIAT.

Given that I believe that student experience lives partially within the classroom, the other portion naturally sits outside. This is why I choose to continue to pursue development of events and materials such as the SIAT Design Jam, SIAT Mixer, and my online course content. One challenge I currently have is that the value that this may (or may not) bring to the student experience at this point is somewhat anecdotal. I have some thoughts shared by students, and fellow colleagues, but there is a distinct lack of tracked year-to-year information on each of these practices which makes it difficult to assess whether or not they have in fact been 'successful'. As a result, I would like to develop better means of understanding how these events and materials factor into student experience as a whole, to be able to more effectively conclude on their usefulness.

The last piece which I believe sits outside of the classroom, is that of mentorship. For me this has taken on the form of mentoring students through their directed studies, as well as mentoring TAs through a variety of initiatives. Mentoring is some of the most rewarding and tiring work I perform as an instructor. I enjoy challenging students on their ideas and being able to push them to explore them in more depth, but the regular time commitment required to effectively mentor small groups or individuals partaking in directed studies can be quite draining. Similarly, I want to be able to support my teaching assistants in their own development as instructors through regular critique and discussion of their practice, but frequently the already high workload of a given term makes it difficult to do so. I've turned to indirect methods of provide my TA's with resources — such as siat.andrewh.ca/ta — which help, but don't offer as much regular feedback as I would like. Regarding directed studies, I have to turn away a number of students and groups per term due to workload concerns. In pursuing my own interests as an instructor I want to explore other means or models of mentorship; to assist both my students and future TAs, as currently I cannot support them to the degree I believe I should.

Teaching Evaluations

A summary of teaching evaluations for my time as an instructor at SIAT. These help illustrate the caliber of my teaching and course design in comparison with my peers in SIAT and FCAT (clarified below). Please view specific courses taught to view complete teaching evaluations for a given course.

Lecturer & Sessional Evaluations (2012-Present)

My evaluations from my time as a Lecturer (2015-Present). The summary below focuses on two summaries from the new Student Evaluation of Teaching and Courses (SETC): (a) "Overall, the quality of instruction provided by the instructor in the course was..." and (b) "Overall, the quality of my learning experience in the course was...", shortened to 'Instructor' and 'Course' respectively in the table below. Averages are from within the faculty as departmental averages are no longer available.

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Lecturer Evaluations Instructor (/5) Course (/5)
Term Course Avg. Mine Avg. Mine
Fall 2017 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.79 4.29 3.70 4.09
Information Design (IAT-235) 4.37 4.14
Web Design & Development (IAT-339) 4.63 4.38
Spring 2017 Information Design (IAT-235) 3.67 4.43 3.62 4.26
Interface Design (IAT-334) 4.43 4.48
Web Design & Development (IAT-339) 4.64 4.50
Fall 2016 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 4.09 4.42 3.96 4.20
Information Design (IAT-235) 4.30 4.04
Web Design & Development (IAT-339) 4.41 4.18
Summer 2016 Web Design & Development (IAT-339) 4.11 4.19 3.95 4.08
Fall 2015 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 4.00 4.25 3.89 3.99
Information Design (IAT-235) 4.28 4.15
Web Design & Development (IAT-339) 4.44 4.38

Below are evaluations from my time as a Sessional Instructor and Lecturer (2012-2015). The summary below focuses on the following values from the older style of evaluation: (a) "I would rate the instructor's teaching ability as" and (b) "I would rate this course as", shortened to 'Instructor' and 'Course' respectively in the table below. Averages are from within the department.

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Sessional Instructor & Lecturer Evaluations Instructor (/4) Course (/4)
Term Course Avg. Mine Avg. Mine
Summer 2015 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.21 3.53 2.94 3.05
Web Design & Development (IAT-339) 3.87 3.57
Spring 2015 Visual Communication Design (IAT-110) 3.41 3.32 3.12 2.71
Information Design (IAT-235) 3.58 3.19
Web Design & Development (IAT-339) 3.66 3.52
Fall 2014 Visual Communication Design (IAT-110) * 3.07 * 2.52
Information Design (IAT-235) 3.16 3.59
Summer 2014 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.32 3.52 3.05 3.07
Visual Communication Design (IAT-110) 3.24 2.82
Spring 2014 Information Design (IAT-235) 3.31 3.35 3.06 3.12
Web Design & Development (IAT-381) 3.59 3.50
Fall 2013 Information Design (IAT-235) 3.30 3.59 3.03 3.17
Sound Design (IAT-340) 3.83 3.40
Summer 2013 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.30 3.41 3.11 3.16
Web Design & Development (IAT-381) 3.67 3.28
Spring 2013 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.26 3.57 3.10 3.22
Interaction Design Methods (IAT-333) 3.45 2.82
Web Design & Development (IAT-381) 3.59 3.24
Fall 2012 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.32 3.67 3.01 3.12
Spring 2012 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.44 3.52 3.35 3.41

TA Evaluations (2008-2011)

My evaluations from my time as a Teaching Assistant (2008-2011). The summary below focuses on two questions from the evaluations: (a) "I would rate the TA's teaching ability as" and (b) "I would rate the tutorial (or lab) as", shortened to 'Instructor' and 'Labs' respectively in the table below. Averages are from within the department.

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TA Evaluations Instructor (/4) Labs (/4)
Term Course Avg. Mine Avg. Mine
Fall 2011 Information Design (IAT-235) 3.36 3.80 3.31 3.52
Spring 2011 Design Thinking (TECH-124) 3.17 3.58 3.02 3.37
Spring 2011 Information Design (IAT-235) 3.24 3.61 3.18 3.39
Fall 2010 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.00 3.90 3.01 3.7
Spring 2010 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.16 3.60 3.07 3.56
Fall 2009 Sound Design (IAT-380) 3.11 3.65 3.11 3.63
Summer 2009 Graphic Design (IAT-102) 3.18 3.23 3.17 3.12
Spring 2009 Systems of Media Representation (IAT-100) 3.19 3.76 3.14 3.67
Fall 2008 Sound Design (IAT-380) 3.16 3.82 3.14 3.73

Future Directions

Given my experiences teaching in SIAT, there are some areas that I would like to — in future — explore to bring back and further improve student experience as an instructor.

Inside the class, continuing to clarify interdisciplinarity for students is a challenge without a clear answer at this point. Given that upper division SIAT students have often voiced their frustrations about the design and coding combinations in the courses I teach, it is evident that my approaches to introducing interdisciplinarity as a practice to them has not yet succeeded. Exploring this problem, and trying to determine ways to help students understand the purpose of such an education would be the next steps to solving it.

Within SFU and the local community, building a community of practice around teaching and training for teaching is something that would very much interest me as a next step. I have spent a significant amount of time working on materials for, or directly training TAs, and it is an audience that I think would benefit from more opportunities to discuss and reflect on practice. What this would look like I admittedly don't know at this point, but a space to share best practices and reflect on failures I believe would be of benefit to the university teaching community. Teaching a class can be a very vulnerable act, as failures can be amplified very quickly. Having a safe space to share, learn from and support failure in a positive light could help future TAs develop into educational leaders.

Beyond the classroom exploring and improving my craft as a multimedia designer would be important to me. It is often difficult to find time within a teaching schedule to devote and focus on developing one's own skills, and I believe having a strong practice of my own makes me a stronger instructor as I can then speak more directly to the skills and practices that students need to employ. At this point, I feel my grasp of design, audio and video are reasonably well formed given my years and level of experience working within those domains (see andrewh.ca) and it is in the areas of programming and physical design that I would like to improve and explore further. Within programming, attending further workshops and conferences that offer me an opportunity to learn more best practices as well as advanced skills within the courses and languages I teach would be beneficial to both my teaching and design practice. For physical design, doing more work exploring materials — such as continuing the exploration of creating wooden eyewear — as well as improving my understanding of fabrication and making through the creation and testing of physical prototypes.

Courses Taught

Below you will find a listing of all courses taught as a Sessional Instructor, Lecturer, and Senior Lecturer (2012-current). As available, included are course materials, evaluations, TAs, course model, number of students and any notable changes to the course.

2018

Spring 2018
Information Design (IAT-235)
Course Materials
Bruce Beh & Alex Honeywell
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
approximately 96 students
Students in this term worked on a CityStudio project developing informational materials around ecological impact and footprints.
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
Course Materials
Elgin Skye-McLaren
2hr lecture + 2hr lab
approximately 40 students

2017

Fall 2017
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
Vinu Subashini Rajus, Vidhi Shah, Yaying Zhang & Ce Zhong
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
165 students
Information Design (IAT-235)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
Elgin-Skye McLaren & Ethan Soutar-Rau
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
96 students
Students in this term worked on a CityStudio project developing informational materials around the upcoming 2018 municipal election.
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
2hr lecture + 2hr lab
40 students
Directed Study
Daniele Perazzolo, Mandy Ng & Ashley Tsang
Directed Study
Dalvir Sahota
Contextual Content Design
Summer 2017

Term off from teaching (1 in 6, non-teaching term). Instead, worked on completing my second pair of cork glasses.

Spring 2017
Information Design (IAT-235)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
Elgin-Skye McLaren & Ethan Soutar-Rau
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
96 students
Students in this term worked on a CityStudio project developing various informational materials around emergency preparedness.
Interface Design (IAT-334)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
Amelia Cole
2hr lecture + 2hr lab
61 students
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
2hr lecture + 2hr lab
34 students
Directed Study
Designing Empathic Web Experiences

2016

Fall 2016
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
186 students
Information Design (IAT-235)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
94 students
Students in this term worked on a CityStudio project developing various informational materials around food waste recycling.
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
2hr lecture + 2hr lab
40 students
Directed Study
African Clinical Data Visualization Website
Directed Study
Christopher Samuel & Katie Kim
Designing Across Cultures
Summer 2016
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
Course Materials Download Evaluations
2hr lecture + 2hr lab
37 students
Spring 2016

Term off from teaching (1 in 9, non-teaching term). Instead, worked heavily on the development of Future Savvy in collaboration with Michael Filimowicz (Senior Lecturer, SIAT).

2015

Fall 2015
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
179 students
Information Design (IAT-235)
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Paul Brokenshire & Rainy Wu
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
95 students
Students in this term worked on a CityStudio project developing various informational materials around retrofitting housing.
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
39 students
Directed Study
Deconstructing Agile: A Look into the Business Culture
Directed Study
Summer 2015
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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Jamie Cheung, Nick Doering, & Naghmi Shireen
2hr lecture + 2hr labs
120 students
Reworked the course from 1-hour lectures to 2-hour lectures + 2hr labs.
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
40 students
Spring 2015
Visual Communication Design (IAT-110)
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3hr lecture
194 students
Information Design (IAT-235)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
95 students
Students worked on developing informational materials and designing structures for the City of Burnaby digital services portal.
Web Design & Development (IAT-339)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
40 students
Directed Study
Lilian Ho

2014

Fall 2014
Visual Communication Design (IAT-110)
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3hr lecture
188 students
Information Design (IAT-235)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
95 students
Students worked on developing informational materials and designing structures for the City of Burnaby golf services portal.Three students interned with the City of Burnaby after completing the course.
Summer 2014:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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1hr lecture + 2hr labs
125 students
Visual Communication Design (IAT-110)
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3hr lecture
117 students
Directed Study
Amrit Mahli & Guramrit Singh
Spring 2014:
Information Design (IAT-235)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
80 students
Web Design & Development (IAT-381)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
48 students
Directed Study
Brendan DeBrincat
Employee Scheduling App: Process blog, Project Sample.
Directed Study
Mason Lee
Google Glass for Photographers: Helping Plan Shoots
Honours Program
Guramrit Singh
Branding for Startups

2013

Fall 2013:
Information Design (IAT-235)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
120 students
Redesigned the course to align with the 3rd year Web Design & Development (IAT-339) as well as to work with a 2hr lecture + 2hr lab model.
Sound Design (IAT-340)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
75 students
Directed Study
Tracy Choi, Brianna Huxtable, Carlo Lai, Paulina Lam
Paper published in CHI 2014 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems.
Directed Study
Lia Estrellado, Lilian Ho, Mary Ngo, Grace Yeung
Jewelry and Crafts E-Commerce Website Research and Development.
Honours Program
Guramrit Singh
Branding for Startups
Summer 2013:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
Download Evaluations
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
130 students
Web Design & Development (IAT-381)
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2hr lecture + 2hr labs
48 students
Reworked the course from 1-hour lectures to 2-hour lectures and 2hr lab model.
Spring 2013:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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1hr lecture + 2hr labs
181 students
Interaction Design Methods (IAT-333)
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1hr lecture + 2hr labs
88 students
Web Design & Development (IAT-381)
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1hr lecture + 2hr labs
72 students
First-ever offering of the course.

2012

Fall 2012:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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1hr lecture + 2hr labs
181 students
Summer 2012:
Graphic Design (IAT-102) at Fraser International College
4hr lecture + lab
37 students
Spring 2012:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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1hr lecture + 2hr labs
189 students

Below you will find a listing of all courses taught as a Teaching Assistant (2008-2011). Included are evaluations, instructors, course models, number of students taught, and any notable work in the course.

2011

Fall 2011:
Publication Design in Transition (PUB-330)
Roberto Dosil (Senior Lecturer, Publishing)
2hr lecture + 1hr labs
32 students across two labs
Information Design (IAT-235)
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Jack Stockholm (Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
72 students across three labs
Spring 2011:
Design Thinking (TECH-124)
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Ben Unterman (Lecturer, SIAT)
2hr lecture + 1hr labs
46 students in one lab
Information Design (IAT-235)
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Jack Stockholm (Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
72 students across three labs
Fall 2010:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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Andres Wanner (Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
48 students across two labs
Spring 2010:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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Andres Wanner (Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
72 students across three labs
Fall 2009:
Sound Design (IAT-380)
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Philippe Pasquier (Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
72 students across three labs
Summer 2009:
Graphic Design (IAT-102)
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Angela Tomizu (Sessional Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
72 students across three labs
Spring 2009:
Systems of Media Representation (IAT-100)
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Jack Stockholm (Sessional Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
96 students across four labs
Fall 2008:
Sound Design (IAT-380)
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Philippe Pasquier (Lecturer, SIAT)
1hr lecture + 2hr labs
72 students across three labs

Service

A collection of all my service work for the department or university community at large.

Service for SIAT

Communications Committee Chair
2017 - 2018

Leading the SIAT Communications Committee on initiatives around our web presence, media promotion, and identity.

Tenure & Promotions Committee
2017 - 2018

Member of the committee reviewing tenure and promotion cases for 2018.

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Member
2014 - 2017

Work as part of the committee has included being the educational goals facilitator for the programming proficiency group as well as working with Carman Neustaedter and Alissa Antle on recommendations for reworking SIAT's capstone course.

Communications Committee Member
2014 - 2017

Work as part of the committee has included facilitating the SIAT identity revision process in collaboration with Carman Neustaedter.

Educational Goals Facilitator for Programming Proficiency
Ongoing since 2015

To develop and test a rubric for evaluating the programming proficiency of our students at a program level.

As part of my time on the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, I have been the facilitator for our department's educational goals rubric development process. My role involves organizing and facilitating meetings between key 'programming proficiency' stakeholders to try and design a rubric for testing the programming proficiency outcomes for our program.

First-year Portfolio
2015 - 2016

To help guide students into effective reflective practice through the development of their own portfolio.

As part of ensuring our first-year students are prepared to critically reflect on their own work and the work of others, Chantal Gibson (Senior Lecturer, SIAT) and I took on a Teaching and Learning Development Grant to integrate portfolio practice across two of our first year-courses — Graphic Design and Design Communication & Collaboration. We developed a portfolio activity that had students engage in design thinking and reflective practice through a process analysis of their work. Our work included the development of shared instructions and grading criteria that explicitly integrated the design and writing principles taught in both courses.

Work on the First-year Portfolio project was presented at the SFU Symposium on Teaching & Learning (May 2016).

Portfolio project resources:

SIAT Design Jam
2014 - 2016

To challenge students to propose solutions for a future-looking conceptual problem.

Started with former SIAT students Rowan Weismiller and Scott Horsfall, the SIAT Design Jam presents students with a different challenge than that of the mixer; resolve a given design problem given tight time constraints and with a variety of people you likely do not know. It offers students an ability to practice employing ideation, prototyping and presentation skills. The event website is available at siatjam.ca

The 2016 design jam brought out over 60 students, alumni and industry members to participate in a challenge on how to promote proactive charitability. To start off our challenge, Stanley Lai — Chimp Designer and SIAT Alumnus — presented our participants with the challenges inherent in promoting financial charitability and practicing design in such a context. Participants then spent the next six hours coming up with proposals which were then presented to our panel of judges including Allen Bevans, Chantal Gibson, and Stanley Lai.

When asked "What was the best part of your day?", design jam participants responded:

"Firing out ideas, really thinking about them, repeating."
"Giving the final presentation and getting feedback. Solid judges!"
"Meeting new people, fun team environment, designing all day."
"When concepts started to form. Coincidentally the same time we got lunch/fed."
SIAT Mixer
Ongoing since 2012.

To give undergraduate students an opportunity to hear what life outside of SIAT is like from alumni and members of industry.

As one of the lead organizers of the SIAT mixer, we — Andrea Barbera (Student Affairs Coordinator, SIAT), Stephanie Greaves (Co-op Coordinator, SIAT), SIAT Advising, and myself — have managed to annually bring out students, alumni, and industry to enjoy an evening of sharing ideas and experiences. It offers current students the opportunity to practice 'soft skills' such as networking and discussion that are so key to their future employment success. The event website is available at siatmixer.ca

TA Training
Ongoing since 2009.

To mentor potential future instructors to improve their own practice, as well as the experience for the students they teach.

Exploring mentorship and improving teaching quality is important to me, both personally and for my team. These are issues I have continued exploring since the 2009 SIAT TA Training, where I presented on preparing labs and facilitating discussion in the classroom with Ben Unterman (SIAT, PhD Candidate). My involvement in TA training has continued with the Spring 2010 and Fall 2010 Burnaby TA/TM Days where I presented on the use of technology in the classroom. When our TA training became integrated with SFU at large (2013), I turned to developing a guide for my own TAs to review common TAing concerns when first starting out.

More recently (2014) I have worked with the likes of Sarah Louise-Turner (Educational Consultant, TLC) to develop a workshop around software facilitation, a gap we identified in the SFU-wide TA training that was especially evident in SIAT. The workshop ended up serving both our TA's as well as the student-led TechBytes software mentorship program.

As there has been renewed interest in SIAT-focused TA training, I have worked with Chantal Gibson (Senior Lecturer, SIAT), Sarah Louise-Turner Sarah Louise-Turner (Educational Consultant, TLC), and Paul Brokenshire (MEd Candidate, SFU) as one of the organizers and facilitators for the Fall 2016 SIAT TA Training. My role involves developing the Facilitating a Lab session in addition to preparing a Canvas package for all SIAT TA-related materials.

Maker Faire Booth Organizer
2016 - 2017

To ensure SIAT is represented at the Vancouver Mini Maker Faire.

Working with Andrea Barbera (Student Affairs Coordinator, SIAT), Ken Zupan (Senior Lecturer, SIAT) and SIAT Advising, I helped organize undergraduate and graduate student presenters for the SIAT booth at the Maker Faire to help showcase what our students do, as well as what our program covers.

10th Anniversary Emcee
2013

To officiate events for SIAT's 10th anniversary.

Was in charge of keeping the evening moving along in a timely manner while introducing different speakers and evening events.

Creative of the Year Judge
2013

To help coordinate with the other judges to select a best project.

The SIAT 10th Anniversary introduced a one-time Creative of the Year event for which I was asked to judge. As the only faculty member representative on the judging committee, I helped to provide feedback on presentations like the other judges but I also acted as a facilitator for the final deliberations.

Service for SFU

Sketching in Practice Symposium Board Member
Ongoing since 2016.

To help facilitate a smooth and successful symposium.

Lead by Susan Clements-Vivian (Senior Lecturer, SIAT) and Jason Toal (Interaction Specialist, TLC), my role as a member of the Sketching in Practice Symposium board was to help in organizing finances, schedule presenters, and to assist in running the event on the day of.

FCAT Ambassador
2014 - 2016

To facilitate relationships between departments of the faculty through the FCAT Undergraduate Conference.

As part of my time as FCAT Ambassador for SIAT, I worked with Katherine Reilly (Assistant Professor, CMNS), Cole Lewis (Assistant Professor, SCA), Rob Kitsos (Associate Professor, SCA), and the FCAT Dean's Office to help organize, curate, and facilitate the annual FCAT Undergraduate Conference. In additional to plenary meetings for the event, there were also a couple of information evenings for incoming students which we attended to help introduce our respective departments.

Faculty SMACKDOWN Debate
2014

To help fundraise for the United Way through a humorous debate.

While my team did not win our debate — likely due to a gaff of my own doing — it was at least a most humorous gaff contributing to the overall laughs positively.

Outside SFU

Board Member at Art for Impact
2012 - 2016.

To help celebrate art's capacity for social change.

A member of the board of Art for Impact (AFI), a non-profit focused on holding interdisciplinary art events for the benefit of other grassroots non-profit organizations. My role has me taking on a variety of tasks from managing their web presence to helping run tech at their events. It is quite an entertainingly varied position.

Dance + Technology Workshop
2013

To provide an introduction and lead a discussion on technological options in performance.

The Dance + Technology Workshop was hosted by the Mocean Dance Company and the CineFlux Research group of the Nova Scotia College of Arts and Design (NSCAD). It offered local professionals and academics an opportunity to encounter, tinker with, and discuss technology relating to theatre performance. At it I presented some of my technological work with Mocean Dance on their piece Body Abandoned.

Technology & Dance Workshop
2011

To introduce more classically trained dancers to the potentials of technology in performance.

This is a short lecture series done in collaboration with Laura Lee Coles for a number of the University of Hilo's performing arts dance classes and the Kea'au Youth Business Centre (KYBC). The lecture for the dance classes was designed to give students a brief introduction to technology in performance, and a series of contexts in which integrating technology in performance would be of benefit. Isadora was used as an example of how technology could be used in combination with dance, and some basic effects and what they might communicate about dance and movement were used to give further context to the lecture.

PD Day Software Tutorials
2010 - 2011

To help local educators learn how to use creative tools effectively.

As part of local Professional Development days for the Surrey School District, I was invited to run workshops for elementary instructors. For both PD days in which I presented, I had instructors learning the basics of working with Photoshop and Illustrator for the purpose of developing better materials for in-class use.

Activity Coordinator at Surrey Children's Festival
2010 - 2013

To help students engage with technology in a creative fashion.

A workshop held for the Surrey Children's Festival and Burnaby Discovery Day to introduce kids to Scratch, a simple programming language for children. Kids between the ages of 8 to 13 took part in a half-hour digital media workshop to create interactive stories using the program, offering them another creative outlet when at the computer.

Professional Development

The listing below is of items that offered specific opportunities to develop my skills as a professional beyond what could be achieved through reading alone. They are grouped into development on improving my teaching practice, updating my domain knowledge, and expanding my teaching toolset.

Teaching Practice

TLC Teaching & Learning Symposium
2016, 2015, 2012

To share and find out about innovations in teaching around SFU.

As part of attending the TLC Teaching and Learning Symposiums I have presented on my own work — iClicker Games (2012), first-year portfolios, and Parti (2016) — and also had opportunity to see and hear about how others are innovating within their own programs. Most recently, the work being done on Universal Design for Learning was beneficial to thinking about my own approaches to designing accessible learning.

BC Festival of Learning
2016

To share and find out about innovations in teaching around BC.

In attending the BC Festival of Learning I not only spent time presenting Parti (2016), but also spent time in a workshop on re-considering what can be considered a 'learning space'. The event was also useful for forming connections, as it is where I met Chad Leaman of the Neil Squire Society with whom I am working on further industry/course integrations.

EdMedia Protege Program
2013

To improve my use of media and technology within the classroom.

Within the program I worked through developing a custom slide deck system allowing for easy HTML-based delivery of slides including features such as like live-code editing and sketching within the slide deck. It is a tool I continue to improve upon and use to this day as part of my online course content.

Rethinking Teaching Workshop
2013

To better understand effective course design and development.

In attending the workshop, I specifically worked on revising (then) IAT-381 — Web Design & Development — for the Summer 2013 term while progressing through the workshop. The purposes for the redevelopment as well as the process are detailed further in my details on designing the course.

Domain knowledge

To Be Designed Conference
2017

To learn about new, and up-and-coming challenges and approaches to design practice.

The To Be Designed web-conference offered the ability to hear from individuals such as Cennydd Bowles, Carla Diana, Giles Colborne, John Maeda, Mike Kuniavsky Liza Kindred, and Chris Noessel speak to future practices in design.

User Research for Everyone Conference
2016

To get a review of the 'state-of-the-domain' from important figures in user research.

The User Research for Everyone web-conference offered the unique opportunity to hear figures such as Erika Hall, Leah Buley, Nate Bolt, Julie Stanford, Abby Covert, and Cindy Alvarez speak to their knowledge of user research, as well as current best practices within the field.

UX Futures Conference
2014

To get a review of the 'state-of-the-domain' from important figures in UX.

The UX Futures Web-conference offered the unique opportunity to hear figures such as Jesse James Garrett, Margot Bloomstein, and Steve Krug speak on their views of the domain of user experience, its definition and where they see the domain heading in future.

SmashingConf + Responsive Design Workshop
2014

To update my knowledge of current web design and development standards and best practices.

As a well-regarded resource for web development and design advice, Smashing Magazine holds a collection of conferences on current best practices. Since the conference was held at Whistler, it offered an easily accessible opportunity to attend the conference. As well as attending the conference, I also partook in a Responsive Design Workshop lead by Vitaly Freidman.

Toolset Expansion

Intro to Virtual Reality (VR) Workshop
2017

To explore building VR applications in Unity.

Attended the Intro to Virtual Reality Workshop on making your own game in VR using the Unity engine. It was a two-day workshop which allowed for exploration into how the Unity engine works for building games, as well as an overview of VR as an entertainment medium.

InstructureCon
2016

To explore in more depth how I can use Canvas as a teaching tool.

Though I was invited to InstructureCon to present on my work on Parti, the conference also offered an opportunity to develop my knowledge and understanding of Canvas further. In addition to attending a variety of talks at the conference, I also participated in two pre-conference workshops focused on how to integrate and create your own additional tools in Canvas.

Visual Facilitation Workshop
2013

To explore how I can better integrate sketching and visuals in my practice as an instructor.

This two day workshop lead by Michelle Laurie and Nancy White helped give me a toolset of approaches and concepts to help create materials that can be interpreted by more than text alone. These workshops and their practice has made an appearance in my TA introduction materials as well as the first-year portfolio project.

Completed Works

Below you will find a collection of talks I have been invited to give, as well as artistic collaborations. Both help to illustrate my continued exploration of my own practice as a designer and speaker outside the confines of the classroom.

Design

ah productions
Ongoing since 2005.

My first foray into design was — and has been — working as a multimedia designer. ah productions is the somewhat unoriginal name I gave my freelance design work spanning the gamut of graphics, web, audio and video design work. I continue to take on freelance projects to date, though much less frequently than before.

Cork Eyewear
2012, Ongoing since 2016.

In 2012, I was frustrated with looking for new glasses frames and I decided to fabricate, by hand, eyewear out of cork. The current pair have survived (since 2012) to this day minus one or two 'incidents' (i.e. soccer ball to the face), which were patched over with some glue.

To expedite the production and ideation process, I am now working with a CNC machine to carve out base frames and explore more designs.

Artistic Collaborations

Body Abandoned
2013-2015

Another collaboration with Sara Coffin, this time working with her associates in Mocean Dance exploring the corporeal self in a digital world. Presented at Dancing on the Edge (2015) and in the Mount Allison University Performing Art Series (2015).

An introductory clip of the piece is available for viewing.

Dark Room
2012-2013

In a piece exploring photography meeting dance, I brought in a live-projection and audience interaction component to my collaboration with the Body Narratives Collective. The piece was performed at the The Shadbolt Centre for the Arts (2012) and later restaged at The Roundhouse (2013).

Droid Fates
2012

Dance video made in collaboration with Triadic Dance Works.

Taking Your Experience for Mine
2011

Further exploring projection and digital technology within dance performance, collaborated with Sara Coffin on a full-length dance piece exploring how present technology affects our interpersonal relations. Presented at The Dance Centre (Vancouver, BC).

An introductory clip of the piece is available for viewing.

Dropped Signal
2009

My first work exploring projection for dance, done in collaboration with Sara Coffin. Presented at The Dance Centre (Vancouver, BC).

Talks

Surrey PechaKucha
2015

Was invited to come and speak at the City of Surrey's Pecha Kucha evening on innovation and design in May 2015. My talk focused on embracing failure in design.

Richmond PechaKucha
2014

Presented a talk at the Richmond Cultural Centre as part of their Human x Technology PechaKucha evening. My talk focused on the 'Digital Vastness' of human experience and how it relates to technology.

Education

Master of Science, SIAT/SFU
2008-2011

Completed and successfully defended my thesis entitled The Beatback System: Exploring Interactive Percussion for Promoting Rhythmic Practice at the School of Interactive Arts and Technology (Simon Fraser University) under the guidance of Philippe Pasquier (senior supervisor) and Arne Eigenfeldt (secondary supervisor).

Bachelor of Arts (Combined Honours), Carleton University
2004-2008

Completed a Bachelor of Arts - Combined Honours – in Music and History while completing a concurrent diploma in Sonic Design at Carleton University.

Citations

  1. Hung, Woei, David H. Jonassen, and Rude Liu. "Problem-based learning." Handbook of research on educational communications and technology 3 (2008): 485-506.
  2. Kearney, Matthew, et al. "Viewing mobile learning from a pedagogical perspective." Research in learning technology 20 (2012).
  3. Liu, Arita. "Parti: Research on an in-class participation system." (2015).
andrewh's teaching CV
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